for families

art and a story

Get comfortable in front of a very large piece of art and listen to a short story that connects with the piece. Each month features a different work of art and story. Presented as a fun, friendly experience, children learn about art and the YAM through storytelling.

Ages: Up to 5 years of age
When: Second Saturday, 10:15 a.m. on Instagram & Facebook
Admission: Free
Reservations: Not Required

learn more

September 11
October 9
November 13
December 11

fam at the yam

FAM at the YAM is for every type of family. Create art with a professional artist, while learning about their processes.

Ages: Families with children of all ages
When: First Fridays, 4 p.m.
Admission: Free
Reservations: Not Required

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October 1
Explore the I Refuse to be Invisible exhibition on Facebook, and learn about some of the techniques that were used by contemporary Indigenous artists.

November 5
Create something that POPS with a local Billings artist based on the POP Power Exhibition.

December 3
Explore new mediums and be inspired by art in the Autio Collection exhibition.

For more information contact:

YAM Museum Art Educator
406.256.6804 x238
outreach@artmuseum.org

honoring linda ewert and the linda & wayne ewert art education fund

When you are visiting the YAM, you may notice a plaque in the Young Families Area honoring Linda Ewert. Linda Ewert was part of the Yellowstone Art Museum for over 30 years in different capacities.

This amazing woman brazenly moved the YAM’s education department from a dedicated ‘children’s hour’, to a well-organized machine of a department with outreach, and integrated satellites into our school systems, local Indigenous schools and their communities, and institutions throughout Billings. In my vote, she single handedly promoted the education of all Billings youth, from preschool to college, through the Yellowstone Art Museum. She sought grants and partnerships, always promoting attendance and involvement in the Education Department. Her humanitarian work with the prisons and Passages and Indigenous agencies provided an outlet and hours of relief for people in need. Linda Ewert developed the Docent volunteer program to a prosperous functioning level, shaving thousands of hours off staff time necessary to promote and apply to showcasing and introducing art to the community in numerous attempts. These included events, evolving student studio time, engaging teens in the YAM Teens program, promoting gallery shows, and educating docents in methods to make art a viable part within the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) societal thrust. Her docent education program popped the use of volunteers right off the charts with connections to a national symposium. YAM docents brought printed artwork into the schools, enhancing and enriching places which had no art instructor in their institution. Docents began conducting specialized tours, using professional development of Visual Thinking Strategies — VTS, which was a huge undertaking to both learn and teach. She was a very strong proponent of the theory that lets people answer the question “What do you see?” Tens of thousands of folks visiting the YAM received conscientious introduction to art appreciation because of this. I call it changing lives and opening minds to what the Yellowstone Art Museum has to offer each one of us. —YAM Docent Jean Posusta

Linda always had a way of making each docent feel they had something unique to bring to the group. Over the years we presented some wonderful docent driven exhibitions and presentations at symposiums under her leadership. Linda was always forward thinking and we always measured up to much larger museums and guiding methods. —YAM Docent Linda Snider