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Upcoming Exhibitions

Art Auction 47

January 22, 2015 - March 7, 2015
The YAM’s auction was the region’s first and it is still the area’s finest and most exciting auction of contemporary regional art! It’s the place to be, and it’s an exceptional way to support the artists living and working in your midst.

Ride 'Em: The Art of Will James

March 26, 2015 - June 14, 2015
Drawn from the Yellowstone Art Museum’s extensive permanent collection of Will James’s work—the largest by far of any museum’s—Ride ‘Em: The Art of Will James will be an exciting cross-section of the paintings, works on paper, first edition books, historic photographs, and memorabilia from the life of Joseph Ernest Nephtali Dufault (1892-1942), a.k.a. Will James.

Floyd D. Tunson: Son of Pop

March 26, 2015 - June 14, 2015
This magnificent exhibition has been praised by the public and critics alike. For Artforum, critic Kyle MacMillan described Tunson's work as "an explosion of ideas and emotions, unhindered by any single stylistic mode" and of the exhibition, Michael Paglia wrote for Art, Ltd. that "Son of Pop highlight(s) Tunson's relentless visual intelligence and thoughtful political views through the brilliant pieces that constitute his more than four decade-long career."

The Botanical Series: Photographs by Gerald Lang and Jennifer Anne Tucker

June 25, 2015 - October 21, 2015
Borrowed from the permanent collection of the University of Wyoming Art Museum, Laramie, Wyoming, The Botanical Series large-format photographs will delight during the summer and fall months of bounty here in Montana.

The Other Side of Midnight, Work by Adolph Dehn

June 25, 2015 - September 27, 2015
Drawn from the private collection of Joseph S. Sample, The Other Side of Midnight introduces visitors to a diverse, sometimes dark, often humorous artist’s work. The exhibition will reveal the breadth of Dehn’s subjects including his fondness for depicting the lively late night jazz scene in Harlem and Manhattan, scenes spoofing the nation’s wealthy elite, and calmer pastoral depictions of the Midwest and South well after the dark hours marking the country’s Great Depression.